top of page

TEACHING / MENTORSHIP

Student Resources and More

“MATERIALS OF THE UNIVERSE” SEMINAR COURSE

CHM 501

The seminar's aim is to bring together chemists, physicists, planetary scientists, and engineers to engage in discussion of the role of thermodynamics, particularly of solid materials, in chemistry, physics, materials science, planetary science, and space exploration.

Traditional Library

STUDENT RESOURCES

  • Letters of Recommendation

  • Contact Me​

SPRING 2023 CHM 598

DESCRIPTION

The overall aim of this graduate seminar course is to bring together chemists, physicists, planetary scientists, and engineers to explore the role of extreme conditions in chemistry, physics, materials science, planetary science and space exploration. This year's course will bring in speakers, drawing upon ASU faculty and external visitors, virtually and in person, to discuss their own research and also activities at their institutions at a level appropriate to beginning graduate students. A number of our speakers will be from national laboratories (e.g. NASA Glenn Research Center, Los Alamos National Lab, Oak Ridge National Lab. Idaho National Lab, and Argonne National Lab) to discuss special facilities and research opportunities related to both materials and space science. ASU’s role in obtaining materials data from Mars and elsewhere in space will also be highlighted.

 

The Navrotsky Eyring Center for Materials of the Universe (MotU) brings together chemists, physicists, planetary scientists, and engineers to engage in multidisciplinary research on the role of materials in planetary science and space exploration. MotU has four major emphases: (1) to understand the staggering diversity of planets in our solar system and beyond (exoplanets) from the point of view of possible materials, pressures, and temperatures within them, (2) to use this diversity of extreme environments to envision and synthesize new materials, (3 )to engineer materials, composites, and systems for aerospace, remote sensing, and space mission applications and (4) to educate the workforce of the future, well versed in planetary science, chemistry, physics, materials science, and engineering. The seminar course emphasizes current research in materials science with applications to energy, sustainability, nuclear materials, and other topics of national importance. The complementary interests of academic and national lab investigators will add diverse perspectives.

Speakers

Alex Navrotsky

January 16th - HOLIDAY NO CLASS – Martin Luther King Day

 

Nathan Jacobson

Carolyn Pearce and Emily Nienhuis

February 6th - Research at INL

Scott Middlemas Idaho National Lab

February 13th - Why thermodynamics

Alex Navrotsky

February 20th - A career in thermodynamics

Alex Navrotsky

February 27th - MotU and FORCE | Alex on Travel

TBD

March 6th - No Class (Spring Break)

March 13th - Los Alamos National Lab, nuclear research at LANL

Robert Putnam and postdoc

March 20th - PIRE collaborations on silicon carbide related materials

Gurpreet Singh

March 27th - Energy related research

Parans Paranthaman and Kumar Jayanthi,

April 3rd - Research at SNL

Kate Helean

April 10th - Environmental research at LANL

Hongwu Xu ASU and Andrew Strzelecki LANL

April 17th - Neutron diffraction at ORNL

Georg Neufeind

April 24th (Last Class) - TBD

Mark Asta

SPRING 2022 CHM 501

DESCRIPTION

The School of Molecular Sciences is continuing this 501-seminar series that is focusing on the Materials of the Universe (MotU), reflecting the new initiative and Center for Materials of the Universe started in 2019 at ASU.  The seminar's aim is to bring together chemists, physicists, planetary scientists, and engineers to engage in discussion of the role of extreme conditions in chemistry, physics, materials science, planetary science and space exploration. This year's course will cover an overview of extreme environments in the universe, including ultra-high and ultra-low temperature and pressure, radiation fields, and other non-equilibrium conditions. We will consider the staggering diversity of planets in our solar system and beyond from the point of view of composition, pressure, and temperature, and discuss materials stability, compatibility, and corrosion under extreme environments. Navrotsky will discuss the fundamentals and we will bring in bring in speakers, drawing upon ASU faculty and some external visitors, to discuss their research at a level appropriate to beginning graduate students.

PAST CLASSES

SPRING 2021 CHM 501

DESCRIPTION

Students will be required to attend all the seminars and write 2-3 page reports on two of them and work one detailed thermodynamic  problem chosen from several on a problem set. Some visits to appropriate laboratories and facilities may be arranged, COVID permitting. Adaptive/Active learning system used. Junior/senior undergraduates in any science or engineering department are welcome to request admission to this class, as well as graduate students in any discipline.

STUDENT RESOURCES

Letter of Recommendation

If you would like to request a letter of recommendation from Professor Navrotsky, please send an email with the following information at least two weeks prior to the submission deadline:​​

  • Current position and position/program to which you are applying

  • Letter-writing guidelines, any related links, and due date

  • A draft of the letter is always welcome

  • Address to which letter should be sent upon completion

  • Your name, CV/resume, how you know Prof. Navrotsky

GET IN TOUCH

Thanks for submitting!

Image by Jake Weirick
bottom of page